Archives

Archives / 2005 / April
  • MilBlogging at BlogNashville

    RandomProbabilities reports: I’ll be leading a session on milblogging at the BlogNashville conference in May, representing both Winds of Change and this site. Among the milblogers who will be present are Bill Roggio of The Fourth Rail (and other sites), Tim Schmoyer of Sisyphean Musings, Donald Sensing of One Hand Clapping and USMC _Vet of WordUnheard. If you’re a milblogger — or read them regularly — or if you report on military matters, you won’t want to miss this chance to meet people and talk about the impact of military bloggers. And if you’re serving in the armed forces and are thinking about blogging, this will be a great chance to talk about the … more

  • Caching Talk in Columbus

    Gave my first presentation since over a year ago this evening to the .NET Developers Group in Central Ohio.  Seemed well-received.  It was in Columbus, Ohio, just 2 hours south of my home, and where I used to work and go to school.  Thanks to Drew and Dave and Nate for having me down, and to INETA for organizing it.  I think there were like 50 or so people but I'm not a great judge.  There were a few questions I had that I wasn't sure what the answer was so I'm going to list them here and either I'll follow up with answers later or more likely somebody more knowledgeable than me will answer them: 1) Does the Yukon/Sql2005 call to Http.Sys to notify that a change … more

  • Data Access Application Block (Enterprise Library)

    I used to be a big fan of the Data Access Application Block.  It used to be nice, simple.  It would save me a lot of repetitive code.  It was a standalone library with basically one class I needed to learn.  It just worked. Enter the Enterprise Library.  This thing is aptly named, in that its complexity is something only an Enterprise would really want to deal with.  In addition to the DAAB, the other various application blocks have been consolidated into the library.  This is probably a good thing, but it would be nice if they were not all tightly coupled together now.  I can no longer use the DAAB by itself (this version - naturally I can keep using … more

  • Visual Studio 2005 Settings

    One new feature of Visual Studio 2005 that I like is the ability to save one's environment settings.  You'll find this under Tools - Import and Export Settings.  From there you can either Import, Export, or Reset your settings.  This is very cool. An idea I shared with the Microsoft team responsible for Visual Studio which I think would be cool for a later release (or perhaps a third party add-on) would be a built-in way to manage these settings online.  Having the ability to go to a file is nice, and I suppose with memory sticks becoming more and more commonplace it's not as big a hassle to try and carry around a file with you as it was a few years ago.  However, … more

  • Whidbey Controls in App_Code Folder

    One very cool feature of Visual Studio 2005 is that you no longer need to build your controls into separate assemblies.  You still *can* and of course if you're a control vendor or if you want to share them, you probably should, but if you just need a control in a single web application, you can drop the class into the /App_Code/ folder and immediately use it on your pages.  The even cooler part is you don't have to add a <%@ Register %> directive!  The “trick” to get this work is in the web.config file.  Add this section: <system.web>  <pages>   <controls>    <add tagPrefix="ss" … more

  • Captain Promotion (and IRR info)

    Received a memo in the mail yesterday from HRC St. Louis informing me that on my 5-year time-in-grade anniversary (in a couple of weeks) as a 1LT, I will be promoted to CPT.  The referenced AR is AR 135-155.  It looks like my previous information that suggested that IRR officers were automatically promoted when they reached their maximum time in grade for their current rank was correct. more

  • Whidbey Beta 2 (ASP.NET 2.0) Goes Live

      Big news!  ASP.NET Beta 2 is now live!  You can view the Go Live license here: http://lab.msdn.microsoft.com/vs2005/golive/license/default.aspx   The ASP.NET Quickstart tutorials have been completely updated for this release as well.  View thousands of samples here: http://beta.aspalliance.com/Quickstart/   As part of this release, there are several new starter kit applications.  They include a Personal Web Site Starter Kit, a Club Site Starter Kit, and a Time Tracker Starter Kit.  Read more about them here: http://lab.msdn.microsoft.com/express/vwd/starterkit/default.aspx   You can read more about these updates here: … more

  • Imminent Site Update

    Very soon, perhaps even this weekend, ArmyAdvice.org will be upgrading to another server and software package, Community Server 1.0.  If you're a user, this will mean changing some URLs you're used to (from armyadvice.org/name/ to armyadvice.org/blogs/name/).  If you're one of our soldiers (or spouses) blogging, it will mean using a new interface to manage your blogs.  In addition, the site will have support for forums, which often provide a better way to have real discussions than blog comments provide for. Thank you for your patience during the move. more

  • Special Book Offer for Iraqistan Troops

    Instapundit reports: A SPECIAL OFFER FOR THE TROOPS: The email I posted earlier from Major John Tammes, about John Scalzi's book Old Man's War, produced this from John Scalzi: Maj. Tammes' note about being "hyped up" to read Old Man's War inspired me to call up Tor Books to see if we could do something special for the service people in Afghanistan and Iraq. I asked, and Tor agreed, to make available a free electronic version of "Old Man's War" for our folks serving in those countries. I call it the "Over There Special Edition" -- it's an .rtf file, about 570kb, with the entire text of the novel. To get it, service people in Iraq and Afghanistan should drop me an e-mail at "omw@scalzi.com" … more

  • Unit Testing with Ordered Tests

    On the NUnit mailing list there's a discussion going on about whether or not it would be useful and/or advisable to be able to specify the order in which unit tests are run by a test harness (in this case, NUnit).  I have to say that I would be strongly in favor of such a feature, and I have some thoughts on how to easily implement it in such a way that it would not greatly disturb anybody who doesn't care what order their tests run in. On the one side, the status quo purists argue that the point of SetUp and TearDown is to put you into a known state before every test.  In some situations, this resulted in a lot of repeated code, which was not ideal for performance.  In a … more

  • Unit Testing with Ordered Tests

    On the NUnit mailing list there's a discussion going on about whether or not it would be useful and/or advisable to be able to specify the order in which unit tests are run by a test harness (in this case, NUnit).  I have to say that I would be strongly in favor of such a feature, and I have some thoughts on how to easily implement it in such a way that it would not greatly disturb anybody who doesn't care what order their tests run in. On the one side, the status quo purists argue that the point of SetUp and TearDown is to put you into a known state before every test.  In some situations, this resulted in a lot of repeated code, which was not ideal for performance.  In a … more

  • Playing with PostXING

    I downloaded PostXING for desktop blog posting.  This is basically my first test to see if it works with this blog. more

  • Use Write Caching to Optimize High Volume Data Driven Applications

    Today I published another caching-related article on AspAlliance.com.  This time I'm looking at caching from another angle -- caching write data rather than read data.  Another term for this is batch updating, and it can have a significant impact on performance for applications that do a lot of writing. Abstract: The typical use of caching applies to read caching, or caching data in the application to avoid reading it from the database. However, for applications that must frequently write back to the database, write caching can provide dramatic improvements to performance. This article describes how to implement write caching for an ASP.NET application. Use of Sql Server XML … more

  • April Snow in Ohio

    It snowed all day yesterday and most of last night.  Around 9pm or so last night, power went out at my house and for most of the houses on my street.  It flickered a few times during the course of the evening, but never came back on.  It's still out today, so I'm sitting at Starbucks trying to get some work done while Michelle and Ilyana are out running some errands.  Here's a picture of my driveway from this morning: Hopefully the power will be fixed this evening. more

  • Children in Iraq

    Lance Frizzell has a nice story about how the 278th from TN are helping local Iraqi children medically and educationally.  Expanded as a news story on BillHobbs.com. Also linked is this story of how Iraqi children hold the key to a peaceful future, which I think is certainly true. more